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The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth (Illustrated)

by H.G. Wells on 2019-06-13

The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth is a science fiction novel by H. G. Wells, first published in 1904. Wells called it "a fantasia on the change of scale in human affairs. . . . I had hit upon [the idea] while working out the possibilities of the near future in a book of speculations called Anticipations (1901)." There have been various B-movie adaptations. The novel is about a group of scientists who invent a food that accelerates the growth of children and turns them into giants when they become adults.

Bert I. Gordon adapted the work to the movies twice. First, he wrote, produced, and directed (for Embassy Pictures) Village of the Giants (1965). In this film, the substance, called simply "Goo", is developed by an 11-year-old Ron Howard. This is consumed by a gang of teenaged troublemakers (led by Beau Bridges) who become giants and take over the town, turning the tables on the knee-high adults. They are eventually defeated by other teens (led by Tommy Kirk).

The Food of the Gods was released by American International Pictures in 1976, again written, produced, and directed by Gordon. Based on a portion of the book, it reduced the tale to an 'Ecology Strikes Back' scenario, common in science fiction movies at the time. The movie was not very successful. However, it did receive a Golden Turkey Award for Worst Rodent Movie of All Time, beating such competitors as The Killer Shrews (1959), The Mole People (1956), The Nasty Rabbit (1965), and Night of the Lepus (1972).

In 1989, Gnaw: Food of the Gods, Part 2 was released, written by Richard Bennett and directed by Damian Lee. Dealing with a pack of giant lab rats wreaking havoc on a college campus, it was even further removed from the book than Gordon's attempts.

The Food of the Gods was first adapted for the comics in January 1961, for Classics Illustrated No. 160, with a painted cover by Gerald McCann, script by Alfred Sundel and interior artwork by Tony Tallarico. The giant wasps were depicted in only two panels and the rats don't appear at all.

A more dynamic and dramatic version, "told in the mighty Marvel manner," was found in Marvel Classics Comics No. 22 (1977). Writer Doug Moench greatly improved on the Classics Illustrated script while Sonny Trinidad produced new artwork.

"Deadly Muffins" in Secrets of Sinister House No. 13 (DC Comics, 1973) is an uncredited version of the story written by John Albano and drawn by Alfredo Alcala.

The First Men in the Moon (Illustrated)

by H.G. Wells on 2019-06-12

The First Men in the Moon is a scientific romance by the English author H. G. Wells, originally serialised in The Strand Magazine from December 1900 to August 1901 and published in hardcover in 1901, who called it one of his "fantastic stories". The novel tells the story of a journey to the Moon undertaken by the two protagonists, a businessman narrator, Mr. Bedford, and an eccentric scientist, Mr. Cavor. Bedford and Cavor discover that the Moon is inhabited by a sophisticated extraterrestrial civilisation of insect-like creatures they call "Selenites".

C. S. Lewis explicitly stated that his science fiction books were both inspired by and written as an antithesis to those of H. G. Wells. Specifically, he acknowledged The First Men in The Moon to be "the best of the sort [of science fiction] I have read...." (from a letter to Roger Lancelyn Green).

The influence of Wells's book is especially visible in Out of the Silent Planet, the first book of Lewis's Space Trilogy. There, too, a central role in the story line is played by a partnership between a worldly businessman interested in the material gains from space travel (and specifically, in importing extraterrestrial gold to Earth) and a scientist with wider cosmic theories.

Also in Lewis's book, the two quietly build themselves a spaceship in the seclusion of an English country house, and take off into space without being noticed by the rest of the world. (It may be noted that both Wells and Lewis, like virtually all science fiction writers until the 1950s, grossly underestimated the resources needed for even the smallest jaunt outside Earth's gravitational field.) Like Wells's book, Lewis's reaches its climax with the Earth scientist speaking to the wise ruler of an alien world (in this case Oyarsa, the ruler of Malacandra/Mars) and blurting out the warlike and predatory nature of humanity.

However, in Lewis's book the businessman-scientist pair are the villains of the piece. Moreover, his scientist, Professor Weston, has a philosophy diametrically opposite to Cavor's, being an outspoken proponent of human colonisation of other planets, up to and including extermination of "primitive natives"

The Food of the Gods

by H.G. Wells on 2018-08-09

The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth is a science fiction novel by H. G. Wells, first published in 1904. Wells called it "a fantasia on the change of scale in human affairs. . . . I had hit upon [the idea] while working out the possibilities of the near future in a book of speculations called Anticipations (1901)."[1] There have been various B-movie adaptations. The novel is about a group of scientists who invent a food that accelerates the growth of children and turns them into giants when they become adults.


The Time Machine - An Invention: Unabridged

by H.G. Wells on 2018-06-21

H.G. Wells classic science fiction tale "The Time Machine" is the first of Wells' "scientific romances" (which included "The Invisible Man," "War of the Worlds" and "The Island of Doctor Moreau").  This edition includes the original, unabridged manuscript as it was originally serialized in the New Republic.

"The TIme Machine" relates the story of The Time Traveller, a Victorian inventor who creates a machine that allows him to travel to any time period.  He chooses to rocket forward into the unknown world of the future, landing in the year 802,701 where he encounters the humanoids descendants of Earth, the seemigly friendly and benign Eloi and the subterranean and primitive Morlocks. 

The Time Traveller rescues and befriends a young Eloi girl named Weena and, upon discovering that his machine has been stolen by the Morlocks, must descend into their dark kingdom to recover it.

Hailed for over a century as one of the finest science fiction stories of all time, H.G. Wells "The Time Machine" is a classic story of adventure, exploration and scientific curiosity.


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